Word on Street affirms reading hardly dead for 200,000 visitors

Torontonians gathered at Queen's Park for the annual Word on the Street event. Torontonians gathered at Queen's Park for the annual Word on the Street event.

Brianne Cail
Life Reporter

Queen’s Park was bustling with book lovers of all ages on Sunday, Sept. 21, who made their way to the 25th annual The Word On The Street Festival.
The event was entirely free, hosting many authors who did readings, answered questions and signed books. There were many book deals offered with proceeds going to support literary organizations around the country.
Joseph Kertes, a Canadian author and Dean of Creative and Performing Arts at Humber College, has attended the festival since it started.
“It’s very, very popular which is a good thing. I love the fact that 100,000 people are interested in books, … that it’s still a reading society. I don’t believe in the death of the book,” Kertes said.
Kertes drew a large crowd this year at a workshop called Lightbulb Idea to Full-Length Novel: How to Get from Page One to the End.
The festival announced it attracted over 200,000 people this year despite the rain earlier in the day. Among the attendees are a large number of students who take advantage of the deals.
Leena Jates, 18, a first year student studying English at the University of Toronto said with a laugh that her favourite part was “cheap books.”
Ryerson University English student Sophie Toll, 19, attended The Word on The Street Festival for her second time this year.
“I love the atmosphere here and all the people,” Toll said.
The festival will make have a change of venue next year as they move from Queen’s Park to the Harbourfront Centre.