Taiwanese showcase spotlights foreign exchange students’ culture

Ellen Teng (left) and Moon Yu dressed in traditional attire for the Taiwanese Cultural Showcase Nov. 25 at North campus. Photo by Haley Falco

Haley Falco
Residence Reporter

Humber College exchange students from Kaohsiung, Taiwan, took over the North campus concourse for the seventh annual Taiwan Cultural Showcase on Nov. 25.

The Taiwanese students wanted to bring awareness to their culture and let Humber students experience some of what their country has to offer, serving traditional food and beverages and performing customary dances.

The students were trying to get “everyone to try traditional Taiwanese food,” said first-year Hospitality and Tourism student Albert Tsai, noting the showcase occurs every autumn.

Participating Taiwanese exchange students held a promotional event at the North campus cafeteria Nov. 20, dressing in costumes and handing out flyers endorsing the showcase to students passing by.

The showcase included stations where Taiwanese students showed attendees how to make paper art and wrote students’ names in Mandarin.

Second-year Business Accounting student Khushali Vadodariya said she was expecting “to learn about the culture and meet new people to understand what their culture means to them and how we should respect other cultures.”

There were five traditional dances performed: a lion dance, a gourmet show, a pop dance, an Aboriginal dance and a techno dance. Tsai performed in two of the five dances and said that there were around 20 people performing in total.

The first meal offered included bubble milk tea, Taiwanese fried chicken, and sweet potatoes. The second followed shortly thereafter and included red bean dessert soup with taro balls. The third meal was a traditional pineapple cake. The final meal was glutinous rice cake and thick pork noodles.

“We come from Taiwan and we want to promote it to Humber students,” first-year student Ellen Teng said.

“I watched the Aboriginal dance and their dress form and the type of movements were good,” Vadodayira said.

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