Toronto road construction equals headaches

The city of Toronto expects to resurface 185 kilometres of roadway in 2014 | Photo by Ian Burns The city of Toronto expects to resurface 185 kilometres of roadway in 2014 | Photo by Ian Burns

Ian Burns
News Reporter

Humber students may feel the crunch with a rough commute this summer and fall.
Toronto will spend more than $215 million this year to improve the quality of roads, expressways and bridges.

“It’s critical that we continue to keep our roads and bridges in a state of good repair,” said Councillor Denzil Minnan-Wong, chair of the city’s Public Works and Infrastructure Committee.

“Council’s decision to provide more funding will allow us to fix more roads in our community.”

The construction is scheduled to start in mid-June, according to Frank Clarizio, Director of Capital Works Delivery with the Department of Engineering and Construction Services, City of Toronto.

Construction on Finch, between Kipling Avenue and Highway 27, will involve road resurfacing and traffic signal work, lasting until November.

On Humber College Boulevard between Lymont Road and Highway 27, road resurfacing with some sidewalk work will occur, finishing by the end of September.

The City expects to complete 185 kilometres of road resurfacing in 2014.

An additional $60 million will be spent on other work, including road work in conjunction with water main and sewer replacement, as well as public realm initiatives such as boulevard greening and the installation of new planters and trees.

Rob Kilfoyle, director of public safety and emergency management with Humber College, is recommending that students know about road construction and how it will affect their commute.

“Be safe, and drive with care and attention,” said Kilfoyle. “Try to find an alternate way to travel, if you can.”

Kilfoyle also recommends students be aware of pedestrians in areas of construction.

“Adding construction increases their vulnerability.”

The City has also developed a resource to make it easier for motorists to find their way around Toronto’s streets.

For road construction details visit