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Pedestrian control problem persists at bus loop

Chris Besik
Crime and security reporter

Yellow-jacketed Humber security guards blew whistles and shouted at oblivious students swarming around the new bus loop at North campus.

Commuting is a daily ritual for many students and Humber’s new bus loop has raised eyebrows in both approval and concern.

It’s more organized, but Humber’s security is worried about bus patrons not obeying safety rules.

“The project has been in planning for many years with various transit agencies. The initial goal was to reduce the traffic on Humber College Boulevard,” said the director of Public Safety and Emergency Services Rob Kilfoyle.

The loop benefits students who are commuting with the TTC, All Miway, Brampton Transit/Zum and VIVA buses.

“It was also designed in an effort to provide a safer and more convenient experience for students and drop them right off on campus as opposed to having them dropped off on the road, and having to cross Humber College Boulevard,” said Kilfoyle.

Second-year general arts and sciences student Nick Toale, 20, has mixed feelings about the loop.

“The bus loop is definitely more organized,” he said. “I dislike the location, a lot of my classes are on the far side of the school, making it easier to be late for class.”

There are various issues that the bus loop has introduced.

“Right now we are having trouble managing pedestrians,” said Kilfoyle. “You’ll notice there are a number of security guards posted around the bus loop and at crosswalks, directing pedestrians.”

Security officers patrol the loop on a constant basis ensuring pedestrians are not getting in front of buses. “It’s a bus loop, and people walk through it,” said Saras Saras, a security officer who patrols the loop.

He believes the busy mornings also cause many pedestrians to disregard security officials.

The issue will be resolved within next month.

“We are in the process of adding new pedestrian control barriers at various points around the bus loop as well as adding new signage,” said Kilfoyle. “We hope to have that mostly completed around the beginning of November, and hopefully that will resolve most of the issues.

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