Humber gets $22 million federal grant for science research

Elvin George


The Canadian federal government gave Humber College $21.6 million to improve water and energy efficiency in addition to help construct the new Centre of Technology and Innovation.

Science Minister Kirsty Duncan announced the grant that will focus on the two projects on Aug. 30 at Humber.

The funding is a part of the Ottawa’s Post-Secondary Institutions Strategic Investment Fund (SIF), providing $2 billion in a three-year span across Canada.

The strategy to improve water and energy efficiency will be implemented through the long-term initiative called the Integrated Energy Master Plan (IEMP).

The IEMP includes goals to use 50 per cent less energy at the college while using 50 per cent less water per student by 2034. The plan also calls for cutting greenhouse gas emissions at the college by 30 per cent.

This expansion is keeping pace with other post-secondary schools across North America, which have their own Integrated Energy Master Plans, such as Sheridan College, Indiana University, and University of Victoria, B.C.

Humber will use this initiative to significantly improve the school’s environment impact by setting specific goals it intends on meeting by 2034.

Planning for the Centre of Technology and Innovation began in April and completion is expected in April 2018. The centre, to be built beside the University of Guelph-Humber, will provide space for research and experiments, according to a Humber statement.

Research Dean Darren Lawless, who’s in charge of the project, said the facility will allow students to practice what they will be learning within their classrooms.

“Students will benefit from the industry interaction and outlets to practice what they are learning in curriculum,” Lawless said. “We anticipate that the students will be exposed and have the opportunity to use the state of art equipment.”

Laura Keating, Senior Research Officer, is also a part of the development and she’s excited about the future learning opportunities for Humber students.

“I think the most exciting part of this initiative will be the innovation and applied research opportunities for students and faculty, and the opportunity to engage with external partners as they try and solve industry problems,” Keating said.

First-year Humber student Mimmo Carravetta, 20, is excited about the new centre and is anticipating being able to work in it.

“I’m lucky my program just started so the final year of my program might be at the new centre,” Carravetta said. “I’m just hoping that the centre will allow the us to expand what we learn in the classroom.”