Humber alumn urges aspiring actors to follow their passion

Head shot of Humber's acting for film and TV alumni Carlos Martinez. (Aldo Quirván) Head shot of Humber's acting for film and TV alumni Carlos Martinez. (Aldo Quirván)

Jason Ramroop

Arts and Entertainment Reporter

Actor and Humber grad Carlos Martinez is not letting his inability to work in the industry because he’s not a Canadian resident stop his acting career.
He wants to create his own films, directing and acting in short films, and possible even a feature length film.
Another goal of Martinez is trying to get an agent, which he has found challenging.
“Trying to get an agent is also harder when you’re a foreigner because when you can’t work in the industry not everyone will take you,” he said.
Martinez came to Humber as an international student from Guadalajara, Mexico and, the now 33-year-old, graduated from the acting for film and television program in 2016.
He earned the Academic Award of Excellence for achieving the highest overall honours average in the program as well as the Dorothy Phillips Memorial Award for Acting in 2015.
Martinez credits his teachers and classmates for success so far in his acting career.
“When you have people with a high degree of commitment and teachers who are willing to go with you every step of the way, it challenges you to do your best,” Martinez said.
Some of his former Humber College professors recall his focus to the art.
“He was completely dedicated to the craft of acting unlike anyone I’ve seen in recent years,” said Maria Ricossa, an acting for film and television instructor. “He is a very passionate person which makes him a very passionate Actor.”
Dixie Seatle, another instructor in the acting for film and television program, described Martinez being resolute in his objectives.
“Carlos was a great student,” Seatle said. “Great work ethic, very talented, risky, determined, passionate.”
“I think acting, it’s all about telling the stories and really sharing what’s really inside of you,” Martinez said. “A lot of people say to be a good actor you have to be a good liar. I totally disagree with that, to be a good actor you have to be very honest.’
Martinez came to Canada wanting to try something new, to
learn more about the ‘American’style of acting, and how to act in a different language.
“It was easier for me to come and study in Canada than it would be in the States,” Martinez said. “And also because Toronto is a city that has a big market for film.”
Outside of acting, Martinez is also combat-trained in the Brazilian martial art capoeira for 15 years. He also has experience in athletics and gymnastics.
“Everything you learn in life can be put in your acting,” Martinez said. “An actor has to be a very cultured person, in my opinion.”
Moving forward, while he would like to work in the industry, he is not concerned with the fame.
“The reason why I want to be an actor is because I have something to say and I think that acting, filmmaking too, has a higher purpose than just entertaining,” Martinez said. “You can communicate things, important things, world events, through acting and through film.”
Martinez continues to grow as an actor and encourages other young actors to avoid being discouraged.
“Pursue it with all your might, but keep that passion alive,” Martinez said. “As long as you have a fire burning inside of you, let that be your strength.
“Acting never stops. Learning never stops. Keep growing and keep creating,” he said.