Guelph-Humber magazine at award Pinnacle

Michael Brown reading the 2014 Emerge Issue. Photo by Ashley Jagpal Michael Brown reading the 2014 Emerge Issue. Photo by Ashley Jagpal

Ashley Jagpal
Arts & Entertainment Reporter

Michael Brown, recent graduate of the University of Guelph-Humber’s Media Studies program, was overwhelmed when he found out the school’s magazine Emerge was nominated for seven Pinnacle awards to be awarded in Philadelphia, Pa., at the at the National College Media Convention Oct. 29 to Nov. 2.

“It was so crazy, really great,” said Brown, who served as editor-in-chief of the annual student publication on technology and culture.
The Pinnacle awards are given by the U.S.-based College Media Association to honour the best college media organizations and individual work. It’s open to any student work that is produced for any college media organization in print, broadcast or online.

Emerge was nominated for: Website of the Year, Feature Magazine of the Year, Best Ad Supplement/Special Section, Best Magazine Contents Page/Spread, Best Magazine Entertainment Page/Spread, Best Online Main Page and Best Social Media Main Page. Brown, who took on his role on Emerge as a part of the fourth year curriculum for the course Media Practices, also designed the content page and oversaw the process.  He said he remembers the stressful times, especially the June 1 deadline.

“I remember working on the graphics at 1 a.m., and having nothing on the last page at 10 p.m.,” said Brown. “We came in 10 a.m. that day and left 1 a.m. the following morning to get things done in time.”

Brown recalled how busy it was to get people together.

“It was a small team of people working on this for no pay,” said Brown. “It was hard because people had jobs or internships and the meetings were only once a week so people would get disinterested and to make time to do this was difficult.”

This year, the issue had a future of the decade theme. The cover started it off, declaring, “this decade changes everything,” and the magazine continues with features on topics from 3-D printing and the bitcoin to a new wave of culinary innovation.

Kimberley Noble, the faculty advisor on the magazine since it was first launched in 2006, said she has seen some impressive changes by the students. “I am always blown away by what students have accomplished on the website or the page,” said Noble. “As an instructor, that’s where I get such pleasure and a sense of satisfaction.”

Noble said the nomination for the magazine is the best part. “Seeing that work and the effort that went into it acknowledged by judges and panels is wonderful. “Emerge gives them a chance to get the stories they really want to tell,” said Noble. “The fact that we say to students each January: this is your publication, and we will, as much as possible, stay out of your way—that seems to work and to inspire students.”

Brown believes the success of this issue was because they had a “really dedicated small group of people.”

“Each year Emerge is showing people what we can do,” said Brown. Being the only Canadian school nominated, he thinks Canadian media has lots of potential. “Just because you’re in a Canadian media school doesn’t mean you can’t do good work,” he said.

Fourth-year Media Studies student Catherine Chen said the acclamation gives her motivation.

“When I heard how many nominations we got, I was fueled with excitement because it’s a reflection of our talents here at Guelph-Humber,” said Chen. “Knowing that I am going to work on the magazine next sets the standard for my work.”