Food4kids reaps benefit of campus Bollywood night

Mahnoor Yawar
A&E Reporter

Humber danced to the beat of its own dhol last Friday night.

LinX Lounge came alive with Bollywood Night, a sold-out 19-plus event that had students and faculty dancing late into the night.

The event was organized by students in the postgraduate Hospitality and Tourism Operations Management program to raise money for Food4Kids.

“We’re doing this for our events planning class, and we started organizing it in about January,” said Sargam Yagnik, 25, the organizer of the event.

Yagnik said they opted for Bollywood night to reach out to the international student body at Humber.

“We felt that a lot of other colleges have pub nights specifically for their international students, but Humber lacked that,” she said.

All proceeds from the event will go towards providing underprivileged children aged five to 14 with healthy packed meals they can take home from school.

“Every dollar that is raised today will go towards providing food for the children,” said Maddie Kassinger, operations coordinator in the Food4Kids Oakville office. “It costs $10 to feed one child for one weekend, so hopefully we can feed a lot of kids in the next couple of weeks.”

Jan Park, community development manager at Food4Kids, said she was very appreciative of Yagnik and the rest of the planning committee for reaching out to the organization and helping children in the community.

“We know that school finishes on June 30 for those kids, but hunger does not stop so we’ve incorporated a summer feeding program to provide four food packages a week to the families,” she said. “Those packages are delivered to the families once a week for an eight week period.”

Park said the organization has grown to provide 980 packages a week over its three years of operation, and it was because of funds like this that they were able to achieve that.

Yagnik said everyone from the DJ to the henna artists were students in the program, so costs were kept to a minimum. There was also a raffle with prizes like Steam Whistle Brewery tours open to everyone attending.

She said the event was a challenge to put together but it exceeded all her expectations in terms of success.

“There were times when we thought it wasn’t going to happen,” she said, looking visibly relieved.

“At one point we thought that if tickets didn’t sell, the 30 of us (in the class) would just come here and we’d give that money to Food4Kids. A lot of people had more faith than I did,” Yagnik said.

Program coordinator Ramesh Srinivasan said he thought the event went wonderfully.

“The students worked hard to make it happen. The music was great, people had a wonderful time, and we raised funds for a wonderful organization,” he said.

The event ran late into the night, and LinX dealt with a number of real security issues. Yagnik said there was a chance that some attendees were selling their wristbands to people who were turned away from getting in, but security officials managed to keep things under control.

“When an event is popular enough for people to re-sell their tickets, that’s a pretty good measure of success,” she said.

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