Don’t be a MOOC, get free education

Gabrielle Austin
Biz/Tech Reporter

A free online database offers college programs to the public, however Humber officials say it  probably won’t make to Humber.

Massive Open Online Courses, or MOOCs, allow for free access to direct education by students anywhere in the world. The courses come without cost and all that’s required is a computer hook-up.

Although MOOCs are not listed for any current available classes at Humber College, their growing prevalence could change the way students view post-secondary education in the future.

While the University of Toronto and the University of British Columbia have MOOCs, Humber does not, said the college’s employment advisor Christine Colosimo. “I think MOOCs are a good idea for experience and general interest because it does take away a large cost that most students stress about,” she said.

MOOC, found on the website Coursera among others, allows students to work at their own pace. “Although students may like it, I do not believe that this list will ever make its way to Humber,’’ Colosimo said, adding that while MOOCs are good for general interest, they don’t offer the same benefits of a postsecondary education.

That’s too bad, said first-year Humber Animation student Samantha Clement.

“‘I think MOOCs would make college and university a lot easier on people because you can do a course from your bed and take your time, while still dealing with the other things that life throws at you,’’ the 19-year-old said.

From a financial view, MOOC sounds like a great idea, said Financial Aid Associate Terry Bedford.

He said that even though the courses are free, they are not government funded and that could put a strain on how students expenses outside of school.