Commuting woes continue

Christiana Chan

News Reporter

Andrea Borgford shivered as she walked home in freezing temperatures from Humber College’s Lakeshore campus.

“I feel less motivated to go to class if I have to walk outside in the cold, and it gets dark earlier so walking home at night can sometimes be uncomfortable, ” said Borgford, a first year advertising and copywriting student.

As Toronto prepares to battle its frigid winter, students are finding their commute to school more difficult under poor weather conditions.

Even with short commutes, students who live closer to campus have a hard time making it to class in the cold.

“On a good day I’d say (my commute is) about an hour,” said Humber engineering student Michael-Angelo Velasquez. “Rush hour, it usually takes anywhere from 1 1/2 hours or more.”

Humber students are travelling from all around Toronto and the GTA. Commuting becomes harder when road conditions aren’t as good, and the weather hits in the negatives.

Whether rain or snow, the weather affects many students on their commute to school. The snow has often left Velasquez waiting at school until 7 p.m. in order to avoid bad traffic.

“There is no point in sitting in traffic for two-plus hours,” said Velasquez, who is from Oshawa.

Toronto has already hit extreme cold weather alerts 10 times this winter, where the average number of alerts in the past decade has been 16.

However, even with colder temperatures and long commutes, many students are still optimistic about their means of transportation.

“Coming from Mississauga, I drive and take the bus, even though it’s colder and it complicates things, it’s not too bad,” said Humber student Linh Nguyen.