Celebrating Toronto’s tastiest cuisines at Winterlicious

Photo by Allie Langohr. Chocolate mousse from La Petite France. Photo by Allie Langohr. Chocolate mousse from La Petite France.

Allie Langohr

Life Reporter

Winterlicious, organized by the city of Toronto, is now happening across the city until Feb. 15.

Participating restaurants offer fixed menus at reduced prices as an invitation to try new places and dishes during the winter.

The menus are priced at $18, $23, or $28 for lunch, and $25, $35, or $45 for dinner. Diners can choose from at least three options each for an appetizer, entrée, and dessert for these prices.

For students, this means more food for roughly the same prices they’d spend on a night out.

Sasha Bayley, a third year sports management student at Humber College, looks forward to attending Winterlicious for the first time this year.

“I’m open to anything,” she said. “That’s what I’m trying to do this year, go to festivals and try new things.

“For what you get, I think it’s worth it,” said Bayley.

Third year sports managment student Brittany Michaud said she will be checking out 259 Host on Wellington Street, an Indian restaurant that offers a variety of vegetarian options. She describes her previous experience with Winterlicious as being able to get three courses for the price of one regular entrée item.

It seems to be worth it for restaurant owners as well.

“Without Winterlicious, we have no one but a few regular customers,” said La Petite France owner Patrick Kleinmann.

This is the fourth year La Petite France, on Bloor Street West near Islington Avenue, is participating in Winterlicious, and Kleinmann said the event is good for drawing in younger crowds.

“I have tablecloths. The younger generations are maybe afraid of tablecloths,” said Kleinmann.

But if Winterlicious is able to draw them in, Kleinmann said he is sure his year-round low prices will keep them coming back.

James Lee, owner of Korean restaurant Arisu, said his aim is to share an almost 6,000 year old Korean philosophy with his customers.

Food and medicine come from the same roots and it is important to consume food from the same environment you live in for the best health, said Lee

Lee said he buys local food as often as possible for this reason.

“We are the best Korean restaurant and not many Canadians truly know about Korean food,” said Lee. “They only know two or three cheap Korean foods and assume all the food looks like that. We are trying to introduce to Canadians good Korean food for them.”

To check out which restaurants are participating, as well as their locations and Winterlicious menus, visit www.toronto.ca/winterlicious.