Alcohol awareness event brings funkiness and education to Lakeshore campus

At the ninth annual Motown themed alcohol awareness event, held at the Student Centre on April 15, students were able to take part in a variety of fun activities to engage them in having fun in a responsible way. (Photo Christy Farr) At the ninth annual Motown themed alcohol awareness event, held at the Student Centre on April 15, students were able to take part in a variety of fun activities to engage them in having fun in a responsible way. (Photo Christy Farr)

Christy Farr
Lakeshore/Orangeville/Carrier Drive Reporter

Alcohol awareness got funked up at Lakeshore campus.

A Motown-themed alcohol awareness event was held Wednesday in the Student Centre.

‘Fight the Temptation’ was the ninth annual event held to educate students about responsible drinking, just in time to reach students as they prepare to finish the school year and go off into the summer.

“Students are faced with temptations to over drink or over consume, and engaging with the vendors here that we have, they will able to have a fun open conversation about what it means to drink responsibly,” said Adam Bornstein, co-chair of the alcohol awareness event and a student of the one-year post-grad public relations program.

Event organizers from the public relations program dressed all in 1960s-style costumes, with a photo booth to commemorate the event, and played funky Motown music throughout.

The event is a Humber Student Success and Engagement Centre initiative, and is one of their main events, said Bornstein.

The event is run twice annually, once in the fall and once in the spring.

This year was the first time the spring event was held at Lakeshore campus, said Bornstein.

“Students like what they are hearing and I think you are selling the message very well,” said Humber College President and CEO Chris Whitaker as he addressed the crowd of students and organizers of the event.

Several vendors were there including the beer company Coors, LCBO, and MADD to promote responsible choices when it comes to alcohol use.

Coors partnered up with TaxiGuy, a company easily called by using an app on smartphones, to deter driving impaired.

The Coors booth featured “beer goggles” that when worn simulate blood alcohol level of 0.12, then students try the difficult task of throwing a bean bag into a hole just a few feet in front of them, said Melisa Chung, social-digital manager at Coors.

Coors was one vendor out of ten and students were encouraged to visit each vendor to receive stamps to then enter into a raffle to receive prizes like Blue Jays tickets, and a Coors mini beer fridge.

Brandon Rowe, a student in the post-grad Public Relations program and co-chair of the event, said this was the first year the social networking site Twitter was incorporated into engaging students.

Coors was asking students to tweet their pledge to celebrate responsibly, said Chung.

Tony Tran, a first-year Marketing student, said he was really enjoying the event because he liked the wide array of booths tailored to different types of information about alcohol and drug awareness.

“I want to be aware of the dangers of alcohol use so I came here to learn more,” said Tran.

Humber Counselling was at the event promoting services that they offer to students throughout the whole school year to help them make responsible choices with drugs and alcohol.

“We can provide counselling when students turn to alcohol because of underlining issues,” said Arpita Patel, a registered nurse at Humber Counselling.

She said a lot of vendors at the event are passing out information that Humber counselling has available all year-around, such as information on taxi services like TaxiGuy to deter drunk driving.

Bernard Trottier, Member of Parliament for Etobicoke-Lakeshore, showed his support for alcohol awareness by addressing the crowd with a few words.

“There are some ways to enjoy alcohol responsibly but there are some inherent risks with this type of activities and other drugs also,” said Trottier. “Every generation has to learn this what seems like for the first time, the more you can get that education and information out there the better off we’ll all be.”

A study by Health Canada says “while illicit drug use has generally been declining, the prevalence of heavy drinking has been holding steady and even increasing, particularly among youth aged 15 to 25.”

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